Motor Vehicle Safety

Despite advances in safety equipment in today’s motor vehicles and improvements in road design, the national incidence of injury and death due to motor vehicle collisions is still remarkably high:

  • Annual number of deaths from auto accidents: approximately 40,000
  • Annual deaths per 100,000 population: 12.5

While heartbreaking for the loved ones they leave behind, death is only one potential result of motor vehicle collisions. Look closely at what is behind the numbers.
Out of the 198 patients from motor vehicle collisions who entered the emergency department at Vassar Brothers Medical Center in 2018:

  • 74 were subsequently admitted to the hospital
  • 21 required a hospital stay of at least 3 days
  • 12 had to go to a rehab facility rather than return directly home

Of those 198 people:

  • 12 were not wearing seat belts
  • 10 were aged between 17 and 26 years

Their pain and suffering can be prevented; learning about safety while traveling in a motor vehicle is a key factor in injury prevention.

Motor vehicle accident prevention for teens

According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety:

  • Nearly 4,000 teens lose their lives to preventable crashes each year
  • 50% of fatalities are caused by not wearing a seat belt
  • Nearly 50% of teens killed are passengers
  • 75% of teen crashes do not involve drugs or alcohol

Impact Teen Drivers is a program designed to raise awareness among teens about the impact of impaired or distracted driving. VBMC will help connect high schools, driving schools, law enforcement agencies and other interested parties with the program. Impact Teen Drivers can help everyone make better choices while traveling in the car either as a passenger or driver. Teaching materials are also available at (https://www.impactteendrivers.org/). Impact Teen Drivers also disseminates the message online through social networking pages on Twitter and Facebook.

Contact jbubel@health-quest.org to discuss delivering this enlightening program to your group of teens.